Article 133: Conduct Unbecoming to an Officer and Gentleman

If you are a member of the armed forces and have been charged with conduct unbecoming to an officer and gentleman, it is important to take action right away to avoid conviction. An experienced military defense lawyer can help you as you attempt to regain your rights.

Article 133 of the UCMJ Defined

According to Article 133 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), a service member can be charged with an Article 133 infraction if he or she is an officer, midshipman, or cadet and has committed acts that are deemed to be “unbecoming to an officer and gentlemen.”

The ideal officer is expected to have certain attributes. He or she can be charged with conduct unbecoming if he or she commits an act such as:

  • Unfair dealing
  • Dishonesty
  • Cruelty
  • Indecency
  • Lawlessness
  • In-decorum
  • Injustice

Examples of Article 133 Infractions

Article 133 notes that officers shall not be expected to meet unrealistic moral standards, but there are limits to its tolerance. There are several different ways that one could violate Article 133, but a few examples include:

  • Cheating during an exam
  • Making false official statements
  • Being drunk in public and acting in a disorderly fashion
  • Using defamatory or insulting language about an officer to said person or other service member
  • Dishonorable failure in paying debts

Possible Consequences of Conviction

If found guilty of conduct unbecoming to an officer and gentleman, the convicted could face serious punishment, including dismissal from the armed forces, forfeiture of all allowances and pay, as well as possible confinement for a maximum of one year.

How We Can Help

Not only can this charge be frightening to your future, it can damage your good name if not taken care of properly. Attorney Garrison Wood specializes in military defense law and is ready to help you obtain the best possible outcome in your case. Contact us today to schedule a free case review.

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