UCMJ Article 106: Spying and Espionage

The act of spying during wartime is a serious offense. If you are an active duty service member who has been charged with espionage under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, you must act quickly to secure an experienced lawyer who knows how to handle these charges in a military context.

Article 106: Spying

According to Article 106 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), the charge of spying is comprised of several elements. To be convicted of spying, the prosecution must prove that the military member being tried:

  • Was gathering or trying to gather critical information about the United States armed forces, or any other sensitive information about the nation
  • Gathered this information with the objective of passing it on to the enemy during wartime

Article 106: Espionage

Article 106 of the UCMJ also covers espionage, which contains several other elements unique to the charge. A military member could be convicted of espionage if he or she communicated some information that pertained to national defense in a specific manner to a foreign country, to either the detriment of the U.S., or the benefit of a foreign country.

Possible Consequences of Conviction

If found guilty of spying or espionage, the convicted could face devastating consequences including dishonorable discharge, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, a life sentence in prison, or possibly death, if the charges warrant capital punishment.

How We Can Help

The consequences of a spying or espionage conviction can be terrifying, but there is still hope for your case. With attorney Garrison Wood on your side, you can rest assured that you are in safe and capable hands.

At Garrison Military Law, we specialize in military defense law and know exactly how to handle charges similar to yours. It’s time to fight back. Contact us today to schedule a free review of your case.

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